Graduate student and other opportunities at the Northern Environmental Geoscience Laboratory at Queen's University

One student is being sought for a BSc thesis or a full MSc project using remote sensing to assess the observed impacts of resource development on landscapes in central Labrador. This project would include evaluation of proposed versus observed land clearing as part of the Muskrat Fall hydroelectric project. This project would involve fieldwork (ground truthing) in at least one summer.

One student is being sought for a BSc thesis or a full MSc project aimed at analyzing climate data in the Environment Canada archives to help generate an understanding of issues in coverage and data quality. 

One student is being sought for a full MSc project aimed at analyzing the potential for future road development in northern Labrador. This project would work from both a qualitative and quantitative approach and could involve interviews and modelling work. 

One student is being sought for MSc projects focused on understanding how snow-vegetation and permafrost interact in Subarctic and Arctic landscapes. Projects would be conducted over vegetation gradients and would examine how snow variability induced by vegetation impacts ground freezing and permafrost. The project would involve fieldwork in the summer or possibly the winter and would include some modelling. One project is directly funded via a recently received ArcticNet grant.

One student is being sought for a PhD project in one of the following areas:

[a] Distribution, characteristics, historical and future changes in peatland permafrost in coastal Labrador from Cartwright, NL to Nain, NL;

[b] Historical and future changes in permafrost distribution in the Labrador region of northeast Canada using spatial modelling;

[c] Influence of experimental snow removal on ground freezing across a variety of Labrador ecozones;

[d] Ecological impacts of multidecadal changes in prostrate shrub cover and height in the Torngat Mountains National Park and adjacent areas of northern Labrador;

[e] Impacts of accelerated vegetation on snow cover and permafrost in Nunatsiavut, Nunavik and NunatuKavut.

For prospective students

The ideal candidate for a MSc project would currently be pursuing a degree in geography, environmental studies, environmental science, biology and/or other natural science areas and would be comfortable with potentially participating in fieldwork in remote areas of Labrador during the summer and/or winter. Depending on the project, knowledge of geographic information systems would be considered an asset but openness to development of additional skills is necessary. Due to the nature of fieldwork, students will be required to undertake training for remote and wilderness first aid, handling of firearms and UAV certification.

 

The ideal candidate for a PhD project would currently be pursuing a graduate degree (MA/MSc) in a field related to the natural sciences (although not strictly obligatory) and would be comfortable with working outside in the field in remote areas of Labrador during the summer and/or winter. Knowledge of geographic information systems and statistics would be considered an asset but openness to development of additional skills is once again necessary. Due to the nature of fieldwork, students will be required to undertake training for remote and wilderness first aid, handling of firearms and UAV certification.

Student funding

Standard financial support provided by Queen’s University’s Department of Geography and Planning and this research laboratory combined provide graduate stipends of $18,000 per year for master students (maximum of 2 years) and $24,000 per year for doctoral students (maximum of 4 years). These stipends are guaranteed assuming that the prospective student provides service as a teaching assistant (TA) throughout their time at Queen’s University. Additional support linked to specific research grants may be provided for specific assistance on ongoing research projects but this will be project specific and should be directly discussed with the project lead.


If applicable, MSc and PhD students can receive additional/contributing financial support by applying for external funding from  the Ontario Graduate Scholarship program (http://www.queensu.ca/sgs/prospective-students/awards-scholarships/ontario-graduate-scholarship), the Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies (http://acuns.ca/en/awards/), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (http://www.nserc-crsng.gc.ca/Students-Etudiants/PG-CS/index_eng.asp) and the Northern Scientific Training Program. 


Note: International students may not qualify for all of the funding opportunities listed above so it is important to consider other potential funding opportunities which may be available for international students.

For more information please contact:

 

Dr. Robert G. Way, robert.way@queensu.ca, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.


A curriculum vitae, sample publication and/or university transcript may be requested from prospective students depending on the project and academic level (MSc vs PhD).


Also see the following information for indigenous students considering Queen’s:
https://www.queensu.ca/sgs/aboriginal-students

Northern Environmental Geoscience Laboratory

If you're looking to contact us for any reason we can be reached in the following ways:
 

Telephone : 613-533-6000 ext. 75914

Email : robert.way@queensu.ca

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We are always on the look-out for more information on permafrost conditions in Labrador. If you have any experiences with frozen ground or any thoughts or ideas on its occurrences please contact us using either the Contact Us / Contribute page or the information in the sidebar.

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